RESEARCH ARTICLE


The Working of the Atomic Force Microscope for Chemical Mapping



Darapond Triampo*, 1, Wannapong Triampo2
1 Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd., Rajchataywee, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
2 Department of Physics and Center of Excellence for Vectors and Vector-Borne Diseases, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd., Rajchataywee, Bangkok 10400, Thailand; Tel: +662-441-9817, Ext. 1126; Fax: +662-889-2337;


Article Metrics

CrossRef Citations:
0
Total Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 895
Abstract HTML Views: 1416
PDF Downloads: 260
Total Views/Downloads: 2571
Unique Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 457
Abstract HTML Views: 730
PDF Downloads: 179
Total Views/Downloads: 1366



© 2009 Triampo and Triampo;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd., Rajchataywee,Bangkok 10400, Thailand; E-mail: scdar@mahidol.ac.th


Abstract

Since the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in 1981 and the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986, over 5,000 publications have cited the article “Atomic Force Microscope” by G. Binnig, C.F. Quate, and C. Gerber (published in Physical Review Letters, 1986). This article presents a short review on the operating principle and possible applications of AFM with special attention devoted to chemical mapping. The article would be useful for beginners in AFM technique.