RESEARCH ARTICLE


Magnetic Behavior at Low Temperature of Carbon Foams Prepared by the Controlled Pyrolysis of Saccharose



Juan Matos*, a, Juan Matos Tamis Dudob, Christopher P. Landeec, Pedro Silvadd, Mark M. Turnbullb
a Chemistry Centre, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research, 21827, Caracas 1020-A, Venezuela
b Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, Worcester, MA 01610, USA
c Department of Physics, Clark University, Worcester, MA 01610, USA
c Physics Centre, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research, 21827, Caracas 1020-A, Venezuela


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© 2009 Matos et al.;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Chemistry Centre, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research, 21827, Caracas 1020-A, Venezuela; Fax: +58-212-5041922; E-mail: jmatos@ivic.ve


Abstract

Carbon films and foams were obtained by the controlled pyrolysis of saccharose. Their irregular topology was confirmed by SEM. The presence of unpaired electrons was established via EPR spectroscopy. Magnetization as a function of both temperature and applied external field was collected using a SQUID Magnetometer and it was confirmed that the samples were paramagnetic at low temperatures (i.e 1.8K-10K) and diamagnetic at temperatures higher than 10K. Results showed that saccharose can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of carbon materials for magnetic applications at low temperature.